Book vs. Movie: Every Day by David Levithan

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Don’t Judge a Book by its Movie is a feature on The Candid Cover spotlighting and reviewing book to movie adaptations.

Book vs. Movie: Every Day by David LevithanTitle: Every Day (Every Day #1)
Author: David Levithan
Narrator: Alex McKenna
Publisher: Listening Library
Cast: Angourie Rice, Justice Smith, Debby Ryan
Director: Michael Sucsy
Screenplay: Jesse Andrews
Publication Date: August 28, 2012

four-stars
Summary (from Goodreads):

Every day a different body. Every day a different life. Every day in love with the same girl.

There’s never any warning about where it will be or who it will be. A has made peace with that, even established guidelines by which to live: Never get too attached. Avoid being noticed. Do not interfere.
It’s all fine until the morning that A wakes up in the body of Justin and meets Justin’s girlfriend, Rhiannon. From that moment, the rules by which A has been living no longer apply. Because finally A has found someone he wants to be with—day in, day out, day after day.

With his new novel, David Levithan, bestselling co-author of Will Grayson, Will Grayson, and Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist, has pushed himself to new creative heights. He has written a captivating story that will fascinate listeners as they begin to comprehend the complexities of life and love in A’s world, as A and Rhiannon seek to discover if you can truly love someone who is destined to change every day.

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Book vs. Movie: Every Day

When I first learned that David Levithan’s book, Every Day, was going to be made into a movie, I was thrilled. The concept is so unique and the experiences that A, the main character, has waking up as someone new each and every day are eye-opening. The film, however, is quite disappointing and does not do the book justice.
 

Every Day Books Pull at Your Heartstrings

The novels Every Day and Another Day give the reader a glimpse of life from so many different perspectives. For unknown reasons, A wakes up each day as a new person. What is so enlightening is the fact that A learns from each host that he/she inhabits. A is never the same person twice and can take the form of any race, shape, disability, or sexuality. When A attempts to find some sort of constant in his/her life, he/she falls in love. It is through the love interest, Rhiannon, that A comes to the realization of what one will do in the name of love. This is not your typical love story, but it really pulls at your heart strings and makes the reader think.
 

The Every Day Movie Misses the Mark

The film version of Every Day seems to attempt to portray the story created by David Levithan, but it really misses the mark. The movie starts off telling about A’s life, but for those who had not read the book, I am not sure how much is understood up until the point that A confesses to Rhiannon his/her situation. It is hard to discuss too much without spoiling the plot, however, the concept that David Levithan created for A, becoming a different person each day is abandoned during this movie. It totally changes the whole game plan and just ruined the entire story. The acting is sub-par, although I did enjoy seeing such a large cast portraying one character.
 

Skip the Movie and Read the Books

If there was ever a time where I would advise one of my readers to skip a movie, this would be it. While I always anticipate that there will be changes in a book to movie adaptation, this one is too far from the original to really be enjoyable for fans of the books. Even if you have never read the Every Day series, this film is not worth the time or the money.
 

About David Levithan

Image of David Levithan.

David Levithan (born 1972) is an American children's book editor and award-winning author. He published his first YA book, Boy Meets Boy, in 2003. Levithan is also the founding editor of PUSH, a Young Adult imprint of Scholastic Press.

 

Book vs. Movie: Nick & Norah’s Infinite Playlist

 

Grey image with movie icons and Don't Judge a Book by its Movie title.

Don’t Judge a Book by its Movie is a feature on The Candid Cover spotlighting and reviewing book to movie adaptations.

Book vs. Movie: Nick & Norah’s Infinite PlaylistTitle: Nick & Norah's Infinite Playlist
Author: Rachel Cohn, David Levithan
Publisher: Alfred A. Knopf Books for Young Readers
Cast: Michael Cera, Kat Dennings, Aaron Yoo
Director: Peter Sollett
Screenplay: Lorene Scafaria
Genres: Contemporary
Publication Date: September 30, 2008

three-half-stars

Summary (from Goodreads):

It all starts when Nick asks Norah to be his girlfriend for five minutes. He only needs five minutes to avoid his ex-girlfriend, who's just walked in to his band's show. With a new guy. And then, with one kiss, Nick and Norah are off on an adventure set against the backdrop of New York City - and smack in the middle of all the joy, anxiety, confusion, and excitement of a first date.

This he said/she said romance told by YA stars Rachel Cohn and David Levithan is a sexy, funny roller coaster of a story about one date over one very long night, with two teenagers, both recovering from broken hearts, who are just trying to figure out who they want to be - and where the next great band is playing.

Told in alternating chapters, teeming with music references, humor, angst, and endearing side characters, this is a love story you'll wish were your very own. Working together for the first time, Rachel Cohn and David Levithan have combined forces to create a book that is sure to grab readers of all ages and never let them go.

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Book vs. Movie: Me and Earl and the Dying Girl

 

Book vs. Movie

Don’t Judge a Book by its Movie is a weekly feature on The Candid Cover spotlighting and reviewing book to movie adaptations.

Book vs. Movie: Me and Earl and the Dying Girl

There are quite a few book vs. movie differences to Me and Earl and the Dying Girl. Ironically, the title of this feature would have the reader believe that books are always better than the film. In most cases, this is often true. When it comes to comparing Me and Earl and the Dying Girl, I much preferred the film to the book. While the book has many enjoyable features, the movie is extremely well done and has brought life to the story. Continue reading