Review: Flower Moon by Gina Linko

Review: Flower Moon by Gina LinkoTitle: Flower Moon
Author: Gina Linko
Publisher: Sky Pony Press
Publication Date: January 2, 2018

four-stars
Summary (from Goodreads):

Tempest and Tally Jo Trimble are mirror twins—so alike they were almost born the same person—and they've been inseparable since birth. But it's the summer they turn thirteen, and it seems like everyone can tell something is changing between them.

Pa Charlie, whose traveling carnival is the best part of every summer, is watching them closer than ever. Digger, who sneaks poor kids onto the carnival rides for free and smiles faster than anyone, seems to be fixing for a fight. Even Mama is acting different, refusing to travel with the carnival this year even though her own twin, who she hasn't seen since childhood, will be there.

And Tally and Tempest are the most different of all. There's a strangeness between them, a thickness to the air, an unseen push and pull, and it's getting stronger. It starts as a feeling, but soon it's sputtering and sparking, hurling them backwards, threatening to explode.

When Tally learns that she and Tempest may not be the first twins in their family to be separated by whatever this force is, she realizes she'll have to find a way to stop it—or she might lose not only her sister, but everyone she loves.

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❃ I received this book for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. ❃


Review: Flower Moon by Gina Linko

Flower Moon by Gina Linko is one of those books that once you start reading, it is hard to set down. Fans of magical realism will really enjoy this story that combines elements of magic and coming of age. The carnival setting gives the narrative a perfect backdrop, and the science that is used to describe the strangeness happening between the sisters is one that contains wonderful jumping off points for the classroom. Continue reading

Book vs. Movie: Wonder by R.J. Palacio

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Don’t Judge a Book by its Movie is a feature on The Candid Cover spotlighting and reviewing book to movie adaptations.

Book vs. Movie: Wonder by R.J. PalacioTitle: Wonder
Author: R.J. Palacio
Publisher: Alfred A. Knopf
Cast: Jacob Tremblay, Owen Wilson, Izabela Vidovic, Julia Roberts
Director: Stephen Chbosky
Screenplay: Stephen Chbosky, Steve Conrad, Jack Thorne
Publication Date: February 14, 2012

four-stars
Summary (from Goodreads):

I won’t describe what I look like. Whatever you’re thinking, it’s probably worse.

August Pullman was born with a facial difference that, up until now, has prevented him from going to a mainstream school. Starting 5th grade at Beecher Prep, he wants nothing more than to be treated as an ordinary kid—but his new classmates can’t get past Auggie’s extraordinary face. WONDER, now a #1 New York Times bestseller and included on the Texas Bluebonnet Award master list, begins from Auggie’s point of view, but soon switches to include his classmates, his sister, her boyfriend, and others. These perspectives converge in a portrait of one community’s struggle with empathy, compassion, and acceptance.

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Wonder: Book vs. Movie

Wonder is a one-of-a-kind book that deals with bullying in a way that is honest, raw, and eye-opening. I haven’t read many middle grade novels in quite a while, and I have to admit that this is the first one that brought big tears to my eyes. The writing is crisp and witty, and the multiple perspectives really help to give the reader a deep understanding of all the sides to the story. Amazingly, the movie is just as wonderful, and although it is a condensed version of the original, it maintains the original themes that Palacio has inspired her readers with. Continue reading

Book vs. Movie: A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness

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Don’t Judge a Book by its Movie is a feature on The Candid Cover spotlighting and reviewing book to movie adaptations.

Book vs. Movie: A Monster Calls

A heart-wrenching and moving audiobook and film, A Monster Calls is a unique story that digs deep into the themes of death and the grieving process. The movie is perfectly cast and is only slightly different from the original story, making it one of the best book to movie adaptations that I have seen in a while. Continue reading

Book vs. Movie: The BFG by Roald Dahl

 

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Don’t Judge a Book by its Movie is a feature on The Candid Cover spotlighting and reviewing book to movie adaptations.

Book vs. Movie: The BFG by Roald DahlTitle: The BFG
Author: Roald Dahl
Narrator: David Walliams
Cast: Mark Rylance, Ruby Barnhill, Rebecca Hall
Director: Stephen Spielberg
Screenplay: Melissa Mathison
Publication Date: June 28, 2013 (first published 1982)

three-stars
Summary (from Goodreads):

Captured by a giant!

The BFG is no ordinary bone-crunching giant. He is far too nice and jumbly. It's lucky for Sophie that he is. Had she been carried off in the middle of the night by the Bloodbottler, or any of the other giants—rather than the BFG—she would have soon become breakfast. When Sophie hears that the giants are flush-bunking off to England to swollomp a few nice little chiddlers, she decides she must stop them once and for all. And the BFG is going to help her!

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Book vs. Movie: The BFG

The BFG book is simply put, classic Dahl. There is a fantastical world that the reader can get lost in, wonderful and vividly described characters and humorous word play. In the audio version narrated by David Walliams, we are given a voice to these relatable characters that makes the listener feel like part of the story. The film adaptation of this book has some fun aspects and maintains the theme of friendship from the original story, however, it falls short of Dahl’s original work and just doesn’t seem to measure up. Continue reading

Book vs. Movie: The Little Prince

 

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Don’t Judge a Book by its Movie is a feature on The Candid Cover spotlighting and reviewing book to movie adaptations.

Book vs. Movie: The Little Prince

The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry is one childhood book that everyone should revisit. The touching tale of the innocence of childhood, friendship, and loss is presented in a way that children can relate to, but there is so much that can be taken and learned as adults from this beautifully written story. While the movie is extremely touching and well done, there are some differences that might surprise fans of the book. Nonetheless, this film really does explore the themes and messages that Antoine de Saint-Exupéry intended in this wonderful film. Continue reading