Book vs. Movie: The Sun is Also a Star

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Don’t Judge a Book by its Movie is a feature on The Candid Cover spotlighting and reviewing book to movie adaptations.

The Sun is Also a Star is a book to movie adaptation that could have been so much more. The novel is an incredible love story that focuses on destiny. However. the screenplay just seems to have strayed so far from the book that it is incredibly boring to watch. With an incredible cast and fantastic cinematography, this is a disappointing film. Continue reading

Book vs. Movie: Every Day by David Levithan

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Don’t Judge a Book by its Movie is a feature on The Candid Cover spotlighting and reviewing book to movie adaptations.

Book vs. Movie: Every Day by David LevithanTitle: Every Day (Every Day #1)
Author: David Levithan
Narrator: Alex McKenna
Publisher: Listening Library
Cast: Angourie Rice, Justice Smith, Debby Ryan
Director: Michael Sucsy
Screenplay: Jesse Andrews
Publication Date: August 28, 2012

four-stars
Summary (from Goodreads):

Every day a different body. Every day a different life. Every day in love with the same girl.

There’s never any warning about where it will be or who it will be. A has made peace with that, even established guidelines by which to live: Never get too attached. Avoid being noticed. Do not interfere.
It’s all fine until the morning that A wakes up in the body of Justin and meets Justin’s girlfriend, Rhiannon. From that moment, the rules by which A has been living no longer apply. Because finally A has found someone he wants to be with—day in, day out, day after day.

With his new novel, David Levithan, bestselling co-author of Will Grayson, Will Grayson, and Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist, has pushed himself to new creative heights. He has written a captivating story that will fascinate listeners as they begin to comprehend the complexities of life and love in A’s world, as A and Rhiannon seek to discover if you can truly love someone who is destined to change every day.

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Book vs. Movie: Every Day

When I first learned that David Levithan’s book, Every Day, was going to be made into a movie, I was thrilled. The concept is so unique and the experiences that A, the main character, has waking up as someone new each and every day are eye-opening. The film, however, is quite disappointing and does not do the book justice.
 

Every Day Books Pull at Your Heartstrings

The novels Every Day and Another Day give the reader a glimpse of life from so many different perspectives. For unknown reasons, A wakes up each day as a new person. What is so enlightening is the fact that A learns from each host that he/she inhabits. A is never the same person twice and can take the form of any race, shape, disability, or sexuality. When A attempts to find some sort of constant in his/her life, he/she falls in love. It is through the love interest, Rhiannon, that A comes to the realization of what one will do in the name of love. This is not your typical love story, but it really pulls at your heart strings and makes the reader think.
 

The Every Day Movie Misses the Mark

The film version of Every Day seems to attempt to portray the story created by David Levithan, but it really misses the mark. The movie starts off telling about A’s life, but for those who had not read the book, I am not sure how much is understood up until the point that A confesses to Rhiannon his/her situation. It is hard to discuss too much without spoiling the plot, however, the concept that David Levithan created for A, becoming a different person each day is abandoned during this movie. It totally changes the whole game plan and just ruined the entire story. The acting is sub-par, although I did enjoy seeing such a large cast portraying one character.
 

Skip the Movie and Read the Books

If there was ever a time where I would advise one of my readers to skip a movie, this would be it. While I always anticipate that there will be changes in a book to movie adaptation, this one is too far from the original to really be enjoyable for fans of the books. Even if you have never read the Every Day series, this film is not worth the time or the money.
 

About David Levithan

Image of David Levithan.

David Levithan (born 1972) is an American children's book editor and award-winning author. He published his first YA book, Boy Meets Boy, in 2003. Levithan is also the founding editor of PUSH, a Young Adult imprint of Scholastic Press.

 

The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue

The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and VirtueTitle:  The Gentleman's Guide to Vice and Virtue (Montague Siblings #1)
Series: Montague Siblings #1
Author: Mackenzi Lee
Narrator: Christian Coulson
Publisher: Katherine Tegen Books
Genres: Historical Fiction
Publication Date: June 27, 2017

four-half-stars

Summary (from Goodreads):

Henry “Monty” Montague was born and bred to be a gentleman, but he was never one to be tamed. The finest boarding schools in England and the constant disapproval of his father haven’t been able to curb any of his roguish passions—not for gambling halls, late nights spent with a bottle of spirits, or waking up in the arms of women or men.

But as Monty embarks on his Grand Tour of Europe, his quest for a life filled with pleasure and vice is in danger of coming to an end. Not only does his father expect him to take over the family’s estate upon his return, but Monty is also nursing an impossible crush on his best friend and traveling companion, Percy.

Still it isn’t in Monty’s nature to give up. Even with his younger sister, Felicity, in tow, he vows to make this yearlong escapade one last hedonistic hurrah and flirt with Percy from Paris to Rome. But when one of Monty’s reckless decisions turns their trip abroad into a harrowing manhunt that spans across Europe, it calls into question everything he knows, including his relationship with the boy he adores.

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Audiobook Review: The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue

When I first heard about The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue, I knew it was going to be amusing. It tells the story of a group on a tour of Europe and contains such likeable characters. I listened to the audio version of the book, and I can definitely say that it completes the epic experience of the story and does and amazing job transporting the listener to 18th century Europe. This book is so original, and I would consider it to be a must-read this year. Continue reading

Audiobook Review: Noteworthy by Riley Redgate

Audiobook Review: Noteworthy by Riley RedgateTitle: Noteworthy
Author: Riley Redgate
Narrator: Bailey Carr
Publisher: Abrams
Genres: Contemporary
Publication Date: May 2, 2017

four-half-stars

Summary (from Goodreads):

A cappella just got a makeover.

Jordan Sun is embarking on her junior year at the Kensington-Blaine Boarding School for the Performing Arts, hopeful that this will be her time: the year she finally gets cast in the school musical. But when her low Alto 2 voice gets her shut out for the third straight year—threatening her future at Kensington-Blaine and jeopardizing her college applications—she’s forced to consider nontraditional options.

In Jordan’s case, really nontraditional. A spot has opened up in the Sharpshooters, Kensington’s elite a cappella octet. Worshiped…revered…all male. Desperate to prove herself, Jordan auditions in her most convincing drag, and it turns out that Jordan Sun, Tenor 1, is exactly what the Sharps are looking for.

Jordan finds herself enmeshed in a precarious juggling act: making friends, alienating friends, crushing on a guy, crushing on a girl, and navigating decades-old rivalries. With her secret growing heavier every day, Jordan pushes beyond gender norms to confront what it means to be a girl (and a guy) in a male-dominated society, and—most importantly—what it means to be herself.

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Audiobook Review: Noteworthy by Riley Redgate

Noteworthy by Riley Redgate contains some of my favourite components in YA, such as music and a boarding school. The main character is so empowering, and the narrator, Bailey Carr, is the perfect person to bring Jordan to life. This book is everything that I could ask for, and I’m sure that everyone will be able to relate. Continue reading

Book vs. Movie: Before I Fall

 

book-movie-before-i-fall

Don’t Judge a Book by its Movie is a feature on The Candid Cover spotlighting and reviewing book to movie adaptations.

Book vs. Movie: Before I FallTitle: Before I Fall
Author: Lauren Oliver
Narrator: Sarah Drew
Publisher: Harper Audio
Cast: Zoey Deutch, Liv Hewson, Jennifer Beals
Director: Ry Russo-Young
Screenplay: Maria Maggenti
Publication Date: March 2, 2010

five-stars

Summary (from Goodreads):

What if you had only one day to live? What would you do? Who would you kiss? And how far would you go to save your own life?

Samantha Kingston has it all: the world's most crush-worthy boyfriend, three amazing best friends, and first pick of everything at Thomas Jefferson High—from the best table in the cafeteria to the choicest parking spot. Friday, February 12, should be just another day in her charmed life.Instead, it turns out to be her last.Then she gets a second chance.Seven chances, in fact. Reliving her last day during one miraculous week, she will untangle the mystery surrounding her death-and discover the true value of everything she is in danger of losing.

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Book vs. Movie: Before I Fall

If you have been following along with this feature for a while, you may have noticed a theme: most movie adaptations of books are usually not as good as the original text. I am thrilled to announce that the movie adaptation of Before I Fall does not fall into this trap. The audio version of Before I Fall by Lauren Oliver is an incredible and powerful story that delves deep into how our actions affect the lives of others. The film, Before I Fall is a brilliantly adapted movie that is diverse and contains wonderful acting. Continue reading