Review: Out of the Blue by Jason June

Review: Out of the Blue by Jason June

Out of the Blue by Jason June is a charming story about merfolk and the meaning of home. I always love a good fish out of water story–literally in this case–and as the book follows one mer’s journey to land, it contains two realistic main characters and the fake dating trope. While I struggled with the execution at times, I still found this an original read with many heartwarming moments. Continue reading

Review: The Other Side of Lost by Jessi Kirby

Review: The Other Side of Lost by Jessi Kirby

The Other Side of Lost by Jessi Kirby is an emotional story about grief and rediscovering yourself. Following an ex-social media star who takes her cousin’s place hiking the perilous John Muir trail, this is a thought-provoking story with a complex main character. In addition to Mari’s inspiring journey to re-discover herself, I loved the book’s emphasis on friendship. This is a powerful read that is sure to tug at your heartstrings. Continue reading

Once Upon a Quinceañera, Monica Gomez-Hira

Once Upon a Quinceañera, Monica Gomez-Hira

Once Upon a Quinceañera by Monica Gomez-Hira is an entertaining story about a summer internship that takes a turn. I enjoyed the tension of the family drama, and I was excited to finally see a book about a quinceañera. While the concept has promise, I found the execution wasn’t as strong as it could have been, and parts of the book drag. However, those looking for a fun and unique romcom will enjoy this one.

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Review: The Paper Girl of Paris by Jordyn Taylor

Review: The Paper Girl of Paris by Jordyn Taylor

The Paper Girl of Paris by Jordyn Taylor is set in Paris during World War II and follows both a member of a resistance group and a girl in the present day who discovers her diary. The historical elements of the book are very well done, and I learned a lot about women in the resistance. However, I didn’t think that the modern storyline was as necessary, and I found the main character’s drama takes away from the emotions of the narration in the past. Continue reading