Review: The Truth About Leaving

Review: The Truth About Leaving

The Truth About Leaving by Natalie Blitt is a book that is both upbeat and heavy as it tells the story of two teens figuring out their futures. I found certain aspects such as the use of poems to communicate interesting, but I didn’t enjoy reading about either of the main characters. The plot is also very convenient, and because of this, I didn’t love the book as much as I had anticipated.

Review: The Truth About LeavingTitle: The Truth About Leaving
Author: Natalie Blitt
Publisher: Amberjack

three-stars
Summary (from Goodreads):

Lucy Green thought she had her senior year in the bag. Cute boyfriend? Check. College plan? Check.

But when her boyfriend dumps her the week before school starts and she literally stumbles into Dov, the new Israeli transfer student, on her first day of school, Lucy’s carefully mapped-out future crumbles.

Determined to have a good senior year, and too busy trying to hold her family together while her mom is across the country working, Lucy ignores the attraction she feels to Dov. But soon, Lucy and Dov’s connection is undeniable. Lucy begins to realize that sometimes, you have to open yourself up to chance. Even if the wrong person at the wrong time is a boy whose bravery you admire and who helps you find your way back to yourself.

Amazon “Book

❃ I received this book for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. ❃

Review

The Truth About Leaving  is a love story about two teens who meet and try to figure out what they’re going to do after high school and how that will impact the other person. There are some interesting poems shared throughout the novel which I thought was a creative way for the characters to communicate, and I also loved the ballet aspects. As well, there is a strong theme of family which is complicated as the main character is forced to assume more responsibility in the household. Overall, I found this book to be relatable but also heavy at times, creating a nice balance.

❀ Creative and Interesting Concept

While I found the concept of the book to be interesting, I didn’t really love either of the main characters. Lucy is facing some tough decisions as she is about to graduate, and it is easy to see how caring she is. That being said, she is pretty plain, and I couldn’t get past some of the ignorant remarks she makes. As for Dov, he is rude, especially at the beginning of the book, and he is still a jerk as his relationship with Lucy progresses. Because I found the characters dislikable, I couldn’t support and root for their relationship as much as I wished I could have. This proved to be an issue for me as the romance is the focus of the book.

❀ Simplistic Plot

Another aspect of the book I didn’t enjoy was the predictable plot. The story is pretty simple, which one could generally expect from a contemporary coming of age novel, but many of the events are awfully convenient. Normally, this is something that I am willing to ignore, but some of the things that take place are too perfect. Personally,  I couldn’t see them happening realistically, especially because of the way things unfolded. There are other ways of executing the story that are a little more believable.

The Truth About Leaving is a story that is both sweet and serious as the characters plan their futures. Although I found the concept intriguing, I didn’t enjoy the characters or the simplistic and unbelievable plot. I didn’t completely dislike this book, but I feel like it could have been better executed.

About Natalie Blitt

Originally from Canada, Natalie Blitt grew up on a steady diet of loyalist adventure stories. It wasn’t until she moved to Chicago after graduating from McGill and receiving a journalism degree from the University of King’s College, that she learned that not everybody sees the loyalists as the heroes. Now living in the Chicago-area, she dreams up young adult novels of a different sort: more kissing, less guns, but always a lot of loyalty. Natalie works at an education think tank and lives with her husband and their three sons. She knows a lot about baseball. She has no choice.

Natalie is represented by Rena Rossner at the Deborah Harris Agency.

16 thoughts on “Review: The Truth About Leaving

  1. Deanna @ A Novel Glimpse says:

    I have been curious about this book. I read another book by this author. I liked it, but didn’t love it. I have been waiting for someone to review it. It sounds good, but not one I’ll probably read. I am not the biggest fan of books with ballet. I’m not sure why. That combined with you not really loving the characters makes me want to pass. Great review!

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